25 Striking Employee Wellness Statistics 2024: Rediscover Workplace Wellness
Wellness at Work,  Healthy at work

25 Striking Employee Wellness Statistics 2024: Rediscover Workplace Wellness

Hey there, fellow wellness enthusiasts!

Today, we’re diving deep into the world of employee wellness statistics,

and let me tell you,

it’s a journey worth taking.

As someone who’s seen the highs and lows of workplace wellness firsthand, I’m excited to explore these numbers with you.

In a world where stress seems to be the norm and burnout is all too common, prioritizing employee wellness isn’t just a nice-to-have—it’s a must.

And that’s where these statistics come in.

They’re not just numbers on a page; they’re insights into the heartbeat of our workplaces, revealing the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.

From mental health to physical well-being, these stats paint a picture of the state of wellness in today’s workforce.

They show us where we’re excelling

and where we can do better, guiding us toward solutions that can truly make a difference.

But more than that, they remind us of the human element behind the data

—the real people whose lives are impacted by the choices we make as

  • employers,
  • leaders,
  • and colleagues.

Because at the end of the day, it’s not just about ticking boxes or meeting quotas; it’s about creating environments where people can thrive, both personally and professionally.

So, as we embark on this journey through the world of employee wellness statistics, let’s keep our eyes open and our hearts engaged.

Let’s use these insights to spark

  • meaningful conversations,
  • drive positive change,
  • and rediscover the power of workplace wellness.

After all, when we invest in the well-being of our people, we’re investing in the future of our organizations—and that’s a journey worth taking together.

Table of Contents

Top Employee Wellness Statistics: Editor’s Choice

  1. Employee recognition reduces hypertension risks by 93.2%.

  2. Only 8.3% of South African employees feel cared for.

  3. Wellness programs rank second least satisfying benefit with 52% satisfaction.

  4. Employers offer wellness programs double the employee utilization rate.

  5. Physical wellness programs yield $358 annual savings per employee.

Top Workplace Wellness Statistics: Editor’s Choice

  1. Workplace stress costs 120,000 lives and $190 billion annually.
  2. Chronic conditions cost the US $1.219 trillion yearly, affecting productivity.
  3. Financial stress leads to 18.2% lower work engagement.
  4. Johnson & Johnson cut absenteeism by 15% with a wellness program.
  5. Witness transformative wellness: 53% drop in injuries, 73% fewer lost workdays.

43% of private industry workers accessed Wellness Programs in 2023.

U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS data estimates that in March 2023, 43% of private industry workers had access to Wellness Programs. 1

State and local government employees: 63% have access to Wellness Programs.

State and local government workers are luckier than private sector workers: 63% of State and local government employees have access to Wellness Programs according to the March 2023 Estimation Data. 2

Wellness Programs rank 14th among accessible employee benefits.

Wellness Programs as an employee benefit is one of the most accessible ones.

Among 41 listed different employee benefits, Wellness Programs ranked as the 14th most accessible employee benefit.

Access to unpaid leave (89%) and access to paid leave for holiday ( 80%) constitute the top 2 employee benefits offered by private sector companies. 3

59% of US Employees find jobs positively affect mental health.

Wellness Programs pay off their investment:

Contrary to popular belief, 59% of U.S. employees believe that their job has a very positive or somewhat positive effect on their emotional and mental health quoting National Longitudinal Surveys 2018 by the U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS. 4

Efforts are paying off more:

Coming to 2020, the number of employees who believe that a job has a very positive or somewhat positive effect on their emotional and mental health has increased to 62%; 3 percent more compared to 2 years ago.

35% of US employees face serious ongoing stress at work.

Serious job stress in the past twelve months?

35% of US employees had serious ongoing stress at work according to a survey of National Longitudinal Surveys 2018. 5

59% of employers support health-limited employees to stay at work.

59%  of employers do anything special to make it easier for employees to stay at work if their health starts to limit their ability to work according to a survey of National Longitudinal Surveys 2018. 6

26% of US employees’ health limits their work capabilities.

26% of US employees state that their health limits the amount of work they can do based on the National Longitudinal Surveys 2018 Data. 7

Prioritize healthy work culture over self-care; 58% of employees agree.

Want mentally healthy employees?

Establish a healthy work culture as a priority over investing solely in self-care practices.

As per the 2023 Mental Health at Work Report by Mind Share Partners, 58% of respondents find a healthy work culture to be extremely helpful or very helpful for mental health, whereas self-care resources like mental health apps and mindfulness programs rank as the least effective factors, with only 35% rating them as extremely useful or very useful. 8

Employees average 3.5 days of absenteeism due to mental health.

According to the 2023 Mental Health at Work Report by Mind Share Partners, employees experienced an average of 3.5 days of absenteeism from work due to mental health reasons. 9

Furthermore, employees acknowledge underperforming at work due to mental health reasons for an average of a whopping 13 days per year.

Workplace stress costs 120,000 lives and $190 billion annually.

Overwhelming workplace stress leads to approximately 120,000 deaths annually and incurs nearly $190 billion in healthcare expenses.

This constitutes 5% to 8% of national healthcare expenditure, mainly arising from high work demands ($48 billion), lack of insurance coverage ($40 billion), and work-family conflicts ($24 billion). 10

Chronic conditions cost US $1.219 trillion yearly, affecting productivity.

According to the 2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, the most recent data available, the United States allocates $1.219 trillion annually to medical expenses.

Of this amount, 86% is attributed to chronic conditions like heart disease, stroke, cancer, arthritis, diabetes, or obesity.

Furthermore, productivity declines associated with personal and family health issues impose a yearly expense of over $225 billion on U.S. employers. 11

Large firms offer wellness programs; smaller ones lag, and only 34% implement them.

Although wellness programs are accessible to employees at over 75% of large companies (1,000 or more employees) 12 , almost half (47.1%) of U.S.-based private sector employees work at small- and medium-sized businesses (500 or fewer employees) , where such programs are less common.

For instance, only 34% of companies with 50 to 100 employees have implemented wellness programs, and they are available at just 56% of employers with 101 to 500 employees. 13

Financial stress leads to 18.2% lower work engagement.

Employees experiencing financial stress and therefore deteriorating financial wellness show an 18.2% decrease in engagement at work concerning the sense of belonging, as per PwC’s 2023 Employee Financial Wellness Survey. 14

96% of employers feel responsible for financial wellness.

Who bears the responsibility for financial wellness?

While 96% of employers perceive themselves as accountable for financial wellness, only 2 out of 5 employers actually provide financial wellness programs according to the Workplace Benefits 2023 Report. 15

Recognition boosts well-being; 88% find appreciation meaningful, a study shows.

Recognition of employees has proven to exert a positive influence on different facets of employee well-being and performance.

In a specific study, a noteworthy 88% of participants expressed that being appreciated held significant meaning for them. 16

Employee recognition reduces hypertension risks by 93.2%.

According to a scientific study conducted by the Sustainability and Health Initiative (SHINE) at Harvard University, there is a strong correlation of 93.2% between receiving employee recognition and reduced risks of hypertension among middle-aged and older working adults. 17

Only 8.3% of South African employees feel cared for.

Merely 8.3% of surveyed South African employees feel their supervisor genuinely cares about their well-being. 18

Wellness programs rank second least satisfying benefit with 52% satisfaction.

Shockingly, the SHRM 2016 Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey unveils that wellness programs rank as the second least satisfying benefit among surveyed employees, with a mere 52% satisfaction level. 19

Employers offer wellness programs double the employee utilization rate.

Shockingly, a 2017 study from the Institute for Health and Productivity Studies at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Washington, D.C. reveals a stark contrast—employers reported offering wellness programs at nearly double the rate of employees who reported having access to them. 20

72.1% believe lower insurance premiums should reward wellness engagement.

In a captivating 2017 study from the Institute for Health and Productivity Studies at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Washington, D.C., a staggering three-fourths (72.1%) expressed the belief that lower insurance premiums should be rewarded to those engaging in wellness programs. 21

Johnson & Johnson cut absenteeism by 15% with a wellness program.

In just two years, Johnson & Johnson slashed their firm’s absenteeism rate by a remarkable 15% after implementing a groundbreaking wellness program. 22

Employers offer incentives; 73% aim to engage the workforce in wellness.

It’s no secret that employers are pulling out all the stops to boost employee engagement in health improvement programs.

Surprising survey results reveal that nearly 73% of employers are offering enticing incentives to get their workforce involved. 23

Wellness programs promise $2 to $6 returns for every dollar.

Countless studies in this realm reveal an intriguing trend— A Harvard Business Review study reveals that every dollar invested in wellness programs promises a return of $2 to $6 in healthcare savings for companies. 24

Physical wellness programs yield $358 annual savings per employee.

Across 22 comprehensive studies, the numbers speak volumes —a physical wellness program yields an average annual savings of $358 per employee in healthcare costs, with costs per employee coming in at just $144. With an astounding return on investment nearing 148%, it’s clear: that wellness pays dividends. 25

Witness transformative wellness: 53% drop in injuries, 73% fewer lost workdays.

One business unit, after just one year of implementing the pedometer program as part of their corporate wellness initiative, reported staggering results:

  • a remarkable 53% drop in recordable injuries,
  • a whopping 73% decrease in lost workday cases,
  • an impressive 83% reduction in lost workdays,
  • a remarkable 74% decline in Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) DART cases,
  • and an incredible 80% cut in DART days.  26

Witness the transformative power of wellness in action!

Final Thoughts

As I reflect on the wealth of employee wellness statistics we’ve explored, one thing becomes abundantly clear:

  • the importance of meaningful work in fostering workplace wellness.

Behind each data point lies a story—a story of individuals striving for

  • balance,
  • purpose,
  • and fulfillment in their professional lives.

The world of today moves quickly.

It’s easy to

  • get caught up in the hustle and bustle,
  • to prioritize productivity over well-being,
  • and to lose sight of the bigger picture.

But these statistics serve as a powerful reminder that true wellness isn’t just about physical health or stress levels

it’s about finding meaning in what we do, day in and day out.

  • When employees feel connected to their work,
  • when they see the impact of their efforts,
  • and when they believe in the mission and values of their organization,

something remarkable happens.

They’re not just showing up to collect a paycheck; they’re showing up with

  • purpose,
  • passion,
  • and a sense of fulfillment that transcends the daily grind.

So, as leaders, colleagues, and champions of workplace wellness, let’s make it our mission to cultivate environments where meaningful work thrives.

Let’s celebrate the small victories, acknowledge the contributions of each individual, and create opportunities for everyone to find purpose in their roles.

Because

  • when we work with purpose,
  • when we feel aligned with our values
  • and connected to something greater than ourselves,

wellness isn’t just a goal to achieve

it’s a natural byproduct of a life well-lived.

And that, my friends, is a journey worth embarking on, one meaningful step at a time.

  1. Employee Benefits in the United States Data, Bureau of Labor Statistics, March 2023 ↩︎
  2. U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS Data 2023 ↩︎
  3. Bureau of Labor Statistics Employee Benefits Data, March 2023 ↩︎
  4. National Longitudinal Surveys, A Program of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2018 Data ↩︎
  5. National Longitudinal Surveys 2018 Data ↩︎
  6. National Longitudinal Surveys, A Program of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2018 Data ↩︎
  7. National Longitudinal Surveys, A Program of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2018 Data ↩︎
  8. Mind Share Partners’2023 Mental Health at Work Report ↩︎
  9. Mind Share Partners’2023 Mental Health at Work Report ↩︎
  10. Goh, J., Pfeffer, J., & Zenios, S. A. (2016). The relationship between workplace stressors and mortality and health costs in the United States. Management Science62(2), 608-628. ↩︎
  11. CDC Work@Health Program ↩︎
  12. Mattke, S., Liu, H., Caloyeras, J., Huang, C. Y., Van Busum, K. R., Khodyakov, D., & Shier, V. (2013). Workplace wellness programs study. Rand health quarterly3(2). ↩︎
  13. 2014 SUSB Annual Data Tables by Establishment Industry ↩︎
  14. PwC’s 2023 Employee Financial Wellness Survey ↩︎
  15. 2023 Workplace Benefits Report, Bank of America ↩︎
  16. Al Fannah, J., Al Ismaili, S., Al Jahwari, F., Mohamed, O., & Al Awaidy, S. T. (2021). Improving the process of employee recognition: An exploratory study. Journal of Hospital Administration10(6), 19-26. ↩︎
  17. Weziak-Bialowolska, D., & Bialowolski, P. (2022). Associations of recognition at work with subsequent health and quality of life among older working adults. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-13. ↩︎
  18. Mngomezulu, N., Challenor, M., Munapo, E., Mashau, P., & Chikandiwa, C. T. (2015). The impact of recognition on retention of good talent in the workforce. Journal of Governance and Regulation4(4), 372-379. ↩︎
  19. SHRM 2016 Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey ↩︎
  20. McCleary, K., Goetzel, R. Z., Roemer, E. C., Berko, J., Kent, K., & De La Torre, H. (2017). Employer and employee opinions about workplace health promotion (wellness) programs: results of the 2015 Harris Poll Nielsen Survey. Journal of occupational and environmental medicine59(3), 256-263. ↩︎
  21. 2017 study from the Institute for Health and Productivity Studies at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Washington ↩︎
  22. Esmaeili, 2014 ↩︎
  23. Swayze, J. S., & Burke, L. A. (2013). Employee wellness program outcomes: A case study. Journal of Workplace Behavioral Health28(1), 46-61. ↩︎
  24. Berry, December 2010 issue of Harvard Business Review ↩︎
  25. Baicker, K., Cutler, D., & Song, Z. (2010). Workplace wellness programs can generate savings. Health affairs29(2), 304-311. ↩︎
  26. Swayze, J. S., & Burke, L. A. (2013). Employee wellness program outcomes: A case study. Journal of Workplace Behavioral Health28(1), 46-61. ↩︎
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